Indian Wells Photo by Author & Executive Coach Chris Edwards
imited Edition Signed Rare Photo New Mexico Indian Wells NOT FRAMED by Author Chris Edwards Books and Photography
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imited Edition Signed Rare Photo New Mexico Indian Wells NOT FRAMED by Author Chris Edwards Books and Photography

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Author Chris Edwards
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The photo was taken while hiking at an undisclosed location in Southern New Mexico. This SKU is for the photo only printed in color 30" by 24" signed limited edition NOT FRAMED.

The reason for non-disclosure is for the protection of this sacred place until protected by the Federal Government and or Department of Native American Affairs.

Similar locations are listed on the national registry of historic places and are protected entities.

An Indian Well or Indian Grinding Hole is a hole in a large rock that was made by native peoples as they ground nuts and other foods in food preparation. Typically they are an outcropping of marbleized limestone with mortar holes that were created by the grinding of nuts, berries and corn mixed with water by a rounded stone.

This holes we discovered are thought to have originated during the tribal times and created by the Anasazi, a civilization that arose as early as 1500 B.C. Their descendants are today’s Pueblo Indians, such as the Hopi and the Zuni, who now live in 20 communities along the Rio Grande, in New Mexico, and in northern Arizona. During the 10th and 11th centuries, Chaco Canyon, in western New Mexico, was the cultural center of the Anasazi homeland and they had villages throughout New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona.

We were fortunate to happen upon several of these sacred locations while hiking in Southern New Mexico. We celebrate the historical significance of their location and have photographed and video tapes them along with petitioning for their protection.